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Review: The EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter’s Guide (first edition)

December 25, 2013

On December 19, Andrew Reid, the creator of EOSHD.com, released The EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter’s Guide. Andrew is a British filmmaker who lives in Berlin. He contributed to the GH3 review on dpreview.com, and he has also published a GH3 review on EOSHD.com.

The EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter's Guide

The EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter’s Guide

I purchased the guide three days ago and have gone through it. People have been posting questions on forums, asking for more information about the guide, so I’ve decided to share my thoughts to help others decide if the guide is right for them.

Andrew says he produced the Shooter’s Guide to save people the time and trouble of having to search  on many forums for information and advice.  This is why I bought it. Although I had the Panasonic GH3 Owner’s Manual, I still needed an experienced coach to advise me on which of the camera’s many settings to select.

The Shooter’s Guide contains many recommendations on choosing settings, shooting video, selecting lenses, editing video,and recording audio. 90 of the guide’s 250 pages are devoted to recommendations and illustrations about lenses and lens adapters. Those pages were not so useful to me because I already chose lenses based on information from Ming Thein’s blog, John Griggs’s blog, and zoom and prime lens test reports from DXOMark.

The guide is heavily video-centric, which is what I needed. For example, although Reid provides images of the pages of the Motion Picture menu, the Custom menu, the Setup menu, and the Playback menu, he doesn’t provide an image of the Rec menu pages, which are largely for photography settings.

I find the guide’s images of menu pages very helpful because they serve as a reference map for quickly finding settings that Andrew recommends. Here’s the guide’s image of the Custom menu pages:

EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter's Guide Custom Menu pages image

EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter’s Guide Custom Menu pages image

For comparison, here’s the Custom menu settings information provided in the Panasonic GH3 Owner’s Manual:

Panasonic GH3 Owner's Manual Custom Menu settings

Panasonic GH3 Owner’s Manual Custom Menu settings

Andrew says he spent a year working on the Shooter’s Guide. In my opinion, he should have spent a few more days. The guide wasn’t proofread, which makes it annoying to read. For example, on page 42, he writes, “Exposure meter shows how brightly exposed the image is on a meter which swings from a centre-point to the right if under exposed or to the right if over exposed.” On page 51, he mentions “Hollywood Settings” that he says he provided at the start of the chapter, but no Hollywood settings were mentioned at the start of the chapter. While page numbers are mentioned for recommended Custom menu settings on page 41, no page numbers are given for recommended Setup menu settings on page 44. Andrew uses affect and effect incorrectly and inconsistently throughout the guide.  The guide also reads in places like a rough draft, which is disappointing for something that costs $19.99 in softcopy.

I hope that Andrew will proofread all future Shooter’s Guides before selling them. I’d be happy to do it for him.

While the EOSHD Panasonic GH3 Shooter’s Guide is not as well written or comprehensive as Sonja Schenk and Ben Long’s Digital Filmmaking Handbook, the guide is a very good companion to the GH3 Owner’s Manual, and it does reduce the steepness of the GH3’s learning curve for people who are new to video, like myself.

If you print the guide, I recommend printing two pages on a single page. This makes it easier to view photos that Andrew uses to compare the effect of different features. Andrew tends to place one photo per page, so to compare photos you have to turn the page. I find it easier to compare photos if they’re on the same page. So I printed the guide like this:

Shooter's Guide cover and first page of Table of Contents

Shooter’s Guide cover and first page of Table of Contents

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